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Biomedical informatics students in Arizona State University's College of Health Solutions who were members of three winning teams at the Mayo Clinic Hack for Health Innovation took their health care solutions another step further by presenting them at the Mayo Clinic Roadrunner Sprint Healthcare Pitch Competition held recently at the ASU Health Futures Center. Similar to the show "Shark Tank," the competition gave the students the opportunity to pitch their health care...
Editor's note: This story is part of a series of profiles of notable spring 2022 graduates . At just 12 years old, Ana “Juli” Rincon got her first glimpse of what a future in health care could look like. The Tucson native volunteered at a nonprofit organization that specialized in integrative care for children living with chronic illnesses and their families. “They provide healing modalities such as reiki, massage therapy, chiropractic work and various other non-invasive healing modalities...
In the summer of 2016, George Bcharah’s family was granted visas to leave war-torn Syria and travel to the United States. Shortly after arriving in Arizona in 2018 — they had been in Minnesota for two years — the Bcharahs discovered they did not qualify for health insurance because of their legal status. George’s father ran out of his heart medication. His mother had to be taken to an emergency room for severe chest pain. George became responsible for navigating the labyrinth health care system...
A “Shark Tank” style pitch event Thursday hosted by Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic gave a look into the future of medicine. Eight companies from around the world gave five-minute pitches on products, platforms, devices and software that address gaps in health care to a panel of industry executives. The winner was a company called Medecipher Solutions , which offers software for health care providers. Misallocating resources can burn out staff and reduce the quality of care for...
Penicillin. X-rays. Pacemakers. Sometimes all it takes to save a life is a little bit of innovation. Beginning Wednesday, March 23, and running through Friday, March 25, Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University will be hosting a collaborative event at the new ASU Health Futures Center to catalyze advancements in modern health care. Mayo Clinic Hack for Health Innovation aims to accelerate the innovation of solutions to solve everyday medical issues. The event has the overarching theme of...
Twenty-seven bones, 27 joints, more than 30 muscles and over 100 ligaments make up the human hand. Coordinating these components with our brain and nervous system, hands are capable of doing amazing things. One thing scientists have not yet been able to do with their own brains and hands, however, is design an effective prosthesis for the thousands of people affected by upper limb loss. “There are many (prosthetic) hands developed by research that are beautiful engineering masterpieces. The...
Researchers from Arizona State University are among the leads for a new prestigious grant expected to total $15.7 million over the next five years from the National Institute on Aging , part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to provide continued support for the Arizona Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center . Edson College of Nursing and Health Innovation Associate Dean and Professor David Coon co-leads the Outreach, Recruitment and Engagement (ORE) Core with Jessica Langbaum from Banner...
Editor’s note: This story is featured in the 2021 year in review . Less than a mile south of the Loop 101 in northeast Phoenix, on a plot of land that just two years ago was nothing but dirt, a new silhouette that represents the future of health care in Arizona has cropped up against the backdrop of the Valley it will serve. Arizona State University’s brand-new Health Futures Center, home of the Mayo Clinic and ASU Alliance for Health Care, is the latest development in the nearly two-decades-...
According to Abhinav Acharya , an assistant professor of chemical engineering at Arizona State University, “a single form of treatment is often not sufficient to defeat a given form of cancer." "We need a combinatorial approach, meaning the use of two or more therapies together.” For example, the tandem application of chemotherapy with immunotherapy or vaccine use could be much more effective than either measure alone. But the problem, Acharya said, is that each of these therapies is...
Editor's note: This story originally appeared in the spring 2021 issue of ASU Thrive magazine. The pain of a lingering sore throat is, in many cases, not just physical. On top of feeling unwell, people often have to enter the health care system to get relief. This often looks like: making a request to take time off work, finding an open appointment, sitting in traffic, filling out paperwork, enduring a throat swab and, finally, paying the bill. Treating common illnesses — strep throat,...

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